Nominal GDP

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Nominal GDP

Gross domestic product without or before accounting for inflation. Comparing nominal GDPs from year to year shows the amount an economy has grown or shrunk in dollar amounts, but does not show how the buying power of those dollars has been affected. Real GDP accounts for inflation. For example, if the nominal GDP has grown 10% and the inflation rate is 3%, the real GDP growth is 7%.
References in periodicals archive ?
7 billion dollars in foreign aid a year, roughly equal to its nominal gross domestic product.
Abu Dhabi's nominal gross domestic product jumped 15.
Fahd Bin Juma'a has said that the Kingdom's nominal Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has risen to SR 990 billion in the first half of the current year and is expected to further rise to SR 1.
Taher made the remarks to the Society of Petroleum Engineers and cautioned them about the consequences about Saudi Arabia's current economic dependency on oil for half of its nominal gross domestic product.
The Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC) recorded a strong economic performance in 2008, with its nominal Gross Domestic Product (GDP) rising to US$ 2.
The total outstanding notional amount of financial derivatives, according to the Bank for International Settlements, is $684 trillion (as of June 2008)--over twelve times the world's nominal gross domestic product.
Bivariate causality test results involving fiscal expenditures, deficits, and nominal gross domestic product are reported thereafter.
In contrast to the experience of the early 1990s, growth in the monetary aggregates relative to nominal gross domestic product has been broadly in line with historical relationships, given the structure of interest rates.
The quarterly real gross domestic product is constructed by deflating nominal gross domestic product, obtained from the Survey of Current Business with the producer price index obtained from CITIBASE.
For instance, Allen Sinai, chief global economist at Lehman Brothers, has estimated that a reduction in capital gains taxation would raise real and nominal gross domestic product by increasing capital spending and capital formation and, thereby, boost future government revenues.
She declined to disclose the actual collections figure for 2015, only saying that they unlikely hit the target even as the amount collected likely grew above nominal gross domestic product (GDP) growth.
Among the many reasons he reviewed as to why now was not the time to raise rates was the current nominal gross domestic product, which had a year-over-year growth rate of 3.