Newly Industrializing Economies


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Newly Industrializing Economies

Economies with a lower GDP relative to the developed world but still with healthy levels of GDP growth. Newly industrializing economies are characterized by a great deal of industry and/or international trade. Newly industrializing economies have relatively (though perhaps not entirely) stable governments. Some newly industrializing economies have a great deal of government intervention while others have virtually none. Examples of newly industrializing economies include India and Brazil. See also: International development.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the four newly industrializing economies in Asia-Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan-the increase in trade-weighted average hourly compensation costs was smaller in 1990 than in 1989, as measured in both national currency and U.
dollars for the entire 1975-90 period and for the 5-year subperiods for the United States, Canada, Japan, Europe, and the Asian newly industrializing economies.
Growth of the newly industrializing economies in Asia has slowed recently, though the rates remain relatively high.
level and the average cost level in the Asian newly industrializing economies of Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan rose to 19 percent of U.
Measures are computed for all foreign countries and for selected country groups, such as Europe and the Asian newly industrializing economies.
Exports to the newly industrializing economies of Asia (NIEs) were particularly strong, spurred both by rapid economic growth in those countries and by more recent gains in U.