Neo-Liberalism


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Neo-Liberalism

A political philosophy that favors free trade, globalization, and openness to the free market. The term is used frequently in an international context, but it may also refer to the politics of a single country. Neo-liberalism advocates floating exchange rates, the reduction or elimination of tariffs, privatization of nationalized companies, and similar practices. International organizations well-known for advocating neo-liberal policies include the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neo-liberalism however is not at all confined to the economic sphere.
Broadly understood, neo-liberalism describes a set of policies generally aimed at reducing the role of the state in the economy.
Neo-liberalism can only flourish in an environment conducive to FDI.
Occupy Love focuses mainly on the safe maternal lap of neo-liberalism that is itself nestled in Wall Street's occupation, but it also documents the convergence of events including the Arab Spring and the melting of the polar ice caps.
The varying perspectives and the challenges caused by the recent economic downturn have intensified interest to interrogate neo-liberalism in terms of theorynexus-praxis.
Raja on Tuesday said the Central Government is moving more aggressively towards neo-liberalism.
Kolozova explains that the neo-liberalism relativized the differences between the left-wing and rightwing.
AUTHORS MCBRIDE and Whiteside examine neo-liberalism in Canada which has seen, over the last several decades, the dismantling of the welfare state, rising levels of privatization, and increasingly liberalized trade and investment.
Summary: On the verge of officially forming a coalition government to run the country and rewrite the nation's pre-revolution constitution, Tunisia's dominant, Islamist political party Ennahda has come under fire for its economic neo-liberalism, both from opponents and from coalition partners.
The Third World debt crisis of the 1980s effectively consecrated the real meaning of neo-liberalism, namely protecting Western financial interests by all means necessary, thus mandating the imposition of structural adjustment and exposing developing nations and farmers to the disciplines of financial markets (Weis 2007).
The rise of neo-liberalism helped to discredit the post-war Keynesian state.
We can dig about in the minutiae of his (shifting) political mindset and his travails with the lefties in his party - amongst a dizzying bunch of other stuff - and I'm sure we'd unpack something resembling neo-liberalism, fuzzy social democracy, good intentions.