Neo-Liberal


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Neo-Liberal

One who favors free trade, globalization, and openness to the free market. The term is used frequently in an international context, but it may also refer to the politics of a single country. Neo-liberals advocate floating exchange rates, the reduction or elimination of tariffs, privatization of nationalized companies, and similar practices. International organizations well-known for advocating neo-liberal policies include the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pursuit of equal opportunity, even of a sparse kind, would have serious policy implications, certainly, which almost no neo-liberal conservative could endorse.
This Dalit value is important in the context of the loss of collective, cooperative, and participatory rights within neo-liberal market relationships.
The increased volume of international trade under the neo-liberal policy regime results from direct state subsidies to long-distance trade and state intervention to reduce the transaction costs of trade -- in both cases socialising the operating costs of transnational corporations.
She then catalogs the effect of neo-liberal development on India, "dead rivers, dry wells, bald mountains, and denuded forests; the ghosts of 250,000 debt-ridden farmers who have killed themselves, and of the 800 million who have been impoverished and dispossessed.
Raja said that communalism and neo-liberal economic policies are equal threats to the country.
Under Lula and Dilma, the Workers' Party's (PT) blending of policies that primarily benefit both financial capital and the poor defies easy classification as either neo-liberal or "post-neo-liberal.
Conversely, Peter Dorey is concerned that social surveys of the population continue to reveal an almost fatalistic attitude towards the continued existence of poverty in British society and condemns the neo-liberal Conservatives for combining their economic freedom with a 'social authoritarian' condemnation of the 'undeserving' poor--a Victorian concept which was resurrected during the 1980s and 1990s.
Although Mrs Thatcher signed up to being part of neo-liberal economics, she had her own reasons for doing so.
I will argue that the success of current soft gateway initiatives is limited by the neo-liberal assumptions that frame government actions in education and business, as they limit government intervention to creating the best environment conducive for individuals and private sector actors to engender wealth.
A neo-liberal conservative government set out to replace the role of unions and tribunals with a legislated floor of minimum standards, but the enforcement of the legal minima required an enhanced government inspectorate.
For instante, in 1975 New Zealand ranked 34 out of 54 countries on a range of indicators for "economic freedom" (many of which are associated with neo-liberal policies), but by 1995 it had jumped to 3rd out of 141, with the biggest increase occurring in the latter decade (Gwartney and Lawson 2007).
In reality, this crisis has been in the making for decades as Republicans and Democrats, the wealthy and the corporate elite, deliberately carried out their own "revolution" to firmly establish corporate rule based on the fundamental neo-liberal economic principles of tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations, corporate tax breaks and subsidies, free markets and free trade, deregulation of financial markets to favor Wall Street, lower environmental protections, privatization of the public sector, and attacks on labor.