Negative Saving

(redirected from Negative Savings)

Negative Saving

A situation in which the persons in an economy save, in the aggregate, less than they spend. For example, suppose a small economy exists in which the people spend in total $1 million, but only manage to save $800,000. This economy has negative savings. By its nature, negative saving requires an economy (though not necessarily the government) to take on debt.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Deutsche Skatbank has become the first EU bank to introduce negative savings rates for retail clients.
Bahrain and the UAE's results regressed, displaying slightly more negative savings sentiments compared to last year, while Qatar was last with a relatively large decline.
Turn the clock back a few years, and the nation was in the midst of a negative savings rate environment.
This shortfall includes the savings and investments of both federal and state governments--mostly large negative savings by these governments in recent years--as well as of U.
However, this view suffers from the fallacy of aggregation: It ignores the fact that when people purchase houses, they generate negative savings to society, canceling other people's positive savings.
The only bright spot: As of 2005, consumers actually had a negative savings rate.
The extent of per capita per month negative savings is higher among landless households and lower among the marginal size of holdings.
Study conclusions include: -- Total savings potential, after cost, is $48 billion for the 200 largest US utilities -- Individual utility savings range from negative savings to $3.
The last time Americans had a negative savings rate was during the early years of the Great Depression.
The last time we had a negative savings rate for an entire year was 1933 during the Great Depression.
Commerce Department says that in 2005 Americans spent more than they earned--a negative savings rate of one-half of one percent for the year, the first time that has happened since the Great Depression.
Given this, where does the American public's own negative savings rate, large average personal debt and general lack of financial literacy fit into this picture?