Negative Saving


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Negative Saving

A situation in which the persons in an economy save, in the aggregate, less than they spend. For example, suppose a small economy exists in which the people spend in total $1 million, but only manage to save $800,000. This economy has negative savings. By its nature, negative saving requires an economy (though not necessarily the government) to take on debt.
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Notice both buildings have negative saving numbers in some months, which indicates the buildings consumed more electricity in those months than they would consume if they were operated in the same manner as during pre-retrofit period.
3 percentage point, reflecting a negative saving rate by nonprofit institutions serving households for each year except 2005.
How quickly consumers move from the negative saving rate of 2005 to something closer to the 10 percent saving rate of a few decades ago will determine the timing and severity of the next recession.
In another words, the government's negative saving is financed by the private sector's positive savings.
But it is worth noting that the boom that preceded the present downturn was not an overnight occurrence; it gathered pace over a decade of negative saving and underinvestment - particularly in the US - along with certain corrupt practices that were readily tolerated in the midst of the "boom" period.
In summary, although the NIPA measure of the personal saving rate is likely to underestimate the true, unobservable rate by a few percentage points, and some logical inconsistencies exist in the NIPA treatment of capital gains, it is difficult to conclude that these discrepancies entirely explain the declining trend in the NIPA measure or--especially--the negative saving rates that have been reported during 2005.
The negative saving rate reflects a statistical glitch, which will reverse itself now that mortgage refinancing has slowed.
Saving rates in the UAE are now the lowest in the region, with 43% of expatriates surveyed reporting zero or negative saving rates - due to high costs and abundance of spending opportunities.
Of course, not all households in these lower income groups have negative saving rates, as shown by the saving rates at the 75th percentile within these three decries.
If we estimate saving as the surplus generated in the household sector we see negative saving generation in the early 1970s.
The days of negative saving may be replaced by a new era of consumer frugality, risk aversion by banks, and the rise of alternative forms of retail financing the questions being for how long and where these changes are likely to have greatest impact.
2 percentage point from 2001 to 2009, reflecting a negative saving rate by nonprofit institutions serving households for each year except 2005.