Natural Law

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Natural Law

In philosophy, the idea that that right and wrong are fixed, immutable things that human reason can discern. Some natural law theorists base natural law on their ideas about God, but one does not need to believe in God in order to believe in natural law. It forms the philosophical basis for what are now called human rights and for that reason is an important contributor to modern liberalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
of natural law especially, suggests that these differences are best
not only gave rise to "modern" theories of natural law, but
Heinrich Rommen asserts, with reference to natural law, that "the
Objectively speaking, natural law, as a term of politics and jurisprudence, may be defined as a loosely knit body of rules of action prescribed by an authority superior to the state.
But natural law does not appertain to states and courts merely.
The natural law should not be taken for graven Tables of Governance, to be followed to jot and tittle; appealed to in varying circumstances, the law of nature must be applied with high prudence.
Proposes a new, natural law approach to normativity, drawing on the strengths of traditional natural law theory
Illustrates how natural law may provide a normative base for law
Since the theory of natural law concerns the foundations of morality, standing as it were at the intersection of theological, philosophical, and juridical disciplines, an account of Hale's intellectual development as it relates to these disciplines is necessary for understanding many of the features of his Law of Nature.
Already in the Discourse we find Hale's discussion of the natural law woven into the fabric of his exposition of Reformed theology.
In the nineteenth century, the Thomistic tradition of natural law based on practical reasonableness was reproposed by Jesuits to counter individualistic utilitarianism and materialistic liberalism.
This view changed with modernity, in the same tradition as natural law, as the role of reason (and therefore the discovery of objective good) was abridged in favor of the concept of will.