Natural Law

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Natural Law

In philosophy, the idea that that right and wrong are fixed, immutable things that human reason can discern. Some natural law theorists base natural law on their ideas about God, but one does not need to believe in God in order to believe in natural law. It forms the philosophical basis for what are now called human rights and for that reason is an important contributor to modern liberalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
grounds for dismissing natural law theory out of hand.
Finnis provides a natural law theory that claims to be solidly grounded in experience and prudence but then urges deliberate ignorance of the likely consequences of one's actions in order to maintain one's moral purity.
Students of jurisprudence and of moral philosophy will find in her book a valuable contribution to contemporary natural law theory, and trenchant support for the claim that moral meaning resides in essential natural facts about our existence as human beings," said Gordon R.
I will conclude by briefly treating an issue, which I believe is actually a non-issue, that has exercised some influential modern critics of natural law theory, such as Hans Kelsen.
Nor does Barnett establish, as I argue in Part II, that the Constitution itself somehow locks us into a commitment to his libertarian, natural rights version of natural law theory.
A call to arms masquerading as a philosophical justification for tyrannicide, Ponet's treatise appeals for authority at every stage of its methodically organized argument to natural law theory.
Although present day philosophers and legal theorists may disagree about the place of moral considerations in natural law theory, there is little dispute about the role of reason.
Lisska's purpose is to provide a conceptual reconstruction of Aquinas' natural law theory that is intelligible to Anglo-American analytic philosophers.
He draws from natural law theory the claim that objectivity in ethics is possible.
In chapter 2, Porter sets out her constructive understanding of natural law theory as it relates to legal philosophy as developed by medieval jurists and theologians such as Gratian, Albert the Great, and Thomas Aquinas.
Just as these and other great Spanish writers worked to elaborate Aquinas' brief discussions of law in the Summa Theologian (principally I-IIae, Q 90-97) and elsewhere into a theory of law suitable for the emerging form of European state, so many of the contributions in this collection can be seen as reflections on natural law theory aimed at connecting it with intellectual traditions of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.
Thoroughly updating his selections to include such topics as critical race theory (Delgado) and the implications of the emergence of the European Union, Culver provides texts and study questions on natural law theory (with Aquinus and Finnis), legal positivism (Austin and Hart), integrity (Dworkin and Riggs v.