Natural Law

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Natural Law

In philosophy, the idea that that right and wrong are fixed, immutable things that human reason can discern. Some natural law theorists base natural law on their ideas about God, but one does not need to believe in God in order to believe in natural law. It forms the philosophical basis for what are now called human rights and for that reason is an important contributor to modern liberalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Van Dun presents us with a broad definition of the core of natural law theory, in which the purpose of law is "to make social life possible.
historical jurisprudence had cast natural law theory as prescientific
for it to distinguish positivism from natural law theory.
Along with Germain Grisez, John Finnis has been a leader in propounding the so-called new natural law theory.
Though related, by most accounts, to natural law theory, it is important to note that modern virtue theorists construct a distinct role for law in virtue theory.
The second-half of Grabill's book is dedicated to analyzing the complex story of how rationalism and the Enlightenment remolded Protestant theology into natural theology and the subsequent effects such a theology had on natural law theory.
Key word: practical reason, theoretical reason, natural law, natural law theory, moral, premoral, new scholasticism.
Catholics who approach the natural law more narrowly or conservatively may not accept his approach, and postmodernists who find any approach to bioethics rooted in natural law theory too arbitrary and resistant to narrative may reject it altogether.
One is the natural law theory and goes back to the view that property rights arise from the labor one contributes to create the property.
Natural law theory begins with reflection upon human nature.
The sections are "Natural Law and History," "Topics in Natural Law Theory," "The Praxis of Natural Law," and "Prospects for the 21st Century.
These texts of Aquinas, of course, provide the classical canon for natural law theory.