Narcoterrorist


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Narcoterrorist

A person or group that conducts violent activities targeted at anti-narcotic police and similar forces. The term is also used for terrorism funded by drug trafficking. Narcoterrorism poses significant political risk in various areas of the world, notably in part of South America.
References in periodicals archive ?
Narcoterrorists have the motivation, the resources, and the ruthlessness to increase the level of violence in the United States substantially.
Although this war by international fanatical terrorists differs enormously from America's earlier exposures to domestic and international terrorism, including enduring street-gang wars, struggles against narcoterrorists, and most attacks on information-based infrastructures, lessons from those experiences are relevant to the present struggle to preserve advanced human civilization.
They see an alliance forming among Chavez, Castro, the FARC, and narcoterrorists, with China engaged in a long-range plan to take over the canal (see NotiCen, 1999-08-12).
Narcoterrorists are so powerful and organized that they exert an inordinate amount of influence over many governments in certain countries, ostensibly through a combination of criminal acts and terrorist methods.
South America also has domestic terrorists as well as narcoterrorists, and the moderate Arab states are always at risk.
The workers were kidnapped by narcoterrorists in the town of Kepashiato in the jungle province of La Convencion, Cusco region, on April 9.
Narcoterrorists present different challenges than socialist-inspired terrorism, or "socioterrorism.
As the process of reversion picks up, so do complaints in Panama that the US is ignoring its promise to clean up the facilities and complaints in Washington that the canal will not be properly defended against narcoterrorists and communists.
Gilman and other hardliners accuse the Clinton administration of "naively cozying up to Colombia's narcoterrorists.
Secretary of Defense William Cohen, attending a meeting last November of the hemisphere's defense ministers in the Colombian port city of Cartagena, stressed the importance of restructuring the military so it can be more effective in combating the country's narcoterrorists and drug traffickers.
These threats can range from unsophisticated activist groups to highly sophisticated, well-armed, and welltrained professional career criminals or narcoterrorists.
We are refocusing this strategic capability more intensely in Afghanistan in an effort to counter the increasing threat of a well-armed anti-Coalition militia, Taliban, al Qaeda, criminal gangs, narcoterrorists, and any other anti-government elements that threaten the peace and stability of Afghanistan.