Narcoterrorism


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Narcoterrorism

Violent activities targeted at anti-narcotic police and similar forces. The term is also used for terrorism funded by drug trafficking. Narcoterrorism poses significant political risk in various areas of the world, notably in part of South America.
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14) Bruce Zagaris, "Protecting the Rule of Law From Assault in The War Against Drugs and NarcoTerrorism," Nova Law Review 703, 15, no.
McCaffrey (US Army, Retired), former head of the US Office of National Drug Control Policy, wrote that, "Mexico is not confronting dangerous criminality--it is fighting for survival against narcoterrorism.
These assets will conduct varying missions including a range of contingency operations, counter narcoterrorism, and theater security cooperation (TSC) activities.
The traditional were narcoterrorism and those that represent a threat to "law and order, by urban gangs and other illegal armed groups.
These include transnational terrorism, narcoterrorism, logistic support and fundraising for Islamic radical groups, illicit trafficking, mass migration, forgery and money laundering, kidnapping, violent demonstrations, crime and urban gangs, and natural disasters.
In Latin America, our shared vision of freedom focuses simultaneously on defeating narcoterrorism, reducing corruption, and raising the poor out of their despair by removing obstacles to economic growth.
The Fox administration has also taken issue with recent statements by DEA director Asa Hutchinson that Mexico could be as vulnerable to narcoterrorism as Colombia.
De la Balze acknowledges that the countries he proposes to integrate into the NAFTA/FTAA "need help in addressing endemic problems such as economic instability, low per-capita income, illiberal democratic practices, and narcoterrorism.
And it seemed that no one state could, on its own, resolve the many post-Cold War security issues that are transnational in nature--for example, narcoterrorism, refugees and mass immigration, and the criminal diversion of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) or WMD material.
Clearly, that limited focus also fails to monitor the growing violent threat of narcoterrorism.
PAINWeek offers a diverse curriculum and multidisciplinary faculty who will present courses in the following areas: addiction, complementary & alternative medicine, geriatrics, health coaching, hypnosis, medical/legal, narcoterrorism, neurology, pain & chemical dependency, palliative care, pediatrics, pharmacology, physical medicine & rehabilitation, primary care, regional pain syndromes, and rheumatology.
They have been working on this since their presidents agreed on a regional "rapid-response force to confront narcoterrorism and other emerging threats" at a Tegucigalpa summit in February 2005 (see NotiCen, 2005-02-17).