Arpanet

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Arpanet

The first digital network that utilized packet switching, which is the transmission of data, regardless of content, in manageable chunks called packets. This was a revolutionary technology and ultimately led to the creation of the modern Internet. It was developed in the 1960s by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
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link rate (Mbps) delay (ms) 0 1 155 4 0 9 310 4 1 2 155 4 2 3 310 4 3 4 155 4 4 5 310 4 5 6 155 4 6 7 310 4 7 8 155 4 8 9 310 Table 3: Link parameters for the nonhomogeneous NSFNET topology.
The network no longer adheres to the rigid and uniform hierarchy that characterized the early Internet and its predecessor, NSFNET.
Gore gets credit for cheerleading on networking from '87 on, and for getting the agencies to get off their behinds and coordinate things a bit," says Mike Roberts, who lobbied for NSFNet funding as vice president of networking at Educom, an association of universities.
For instance, a researcher using NSFNET, ARPANET and BITNET, which links many universities, must remember at least three different personal codes and password -- and the appropriate "address" for a person receiving a message at the other end.
CSNET's success and acceptance encouraged the NSF to undertake the NSFNET program which brought open networking to an even larger academic community and presaged the emergence of the modern Internet.
R&E networks played a central role in the development and growth of the Internet itself through ARPANET and later NSFNET.
15) Quickly, use of the NSFnet expanded beyond its research origins to include universities, government agencies, corporations, and the public at large.
The universities, as I understand it, are currently approaching NSF to build another NSFNET for them.
The NSFNet Backbone Service is the fastest and most powerful of the university, government and commercial networks known collectively as the Internet.
By the late 1980s, the National Science Foundation put into place a new national wide-area network called NSFNET, which took the place of ARPANET as a critical part of the Internet backbone and signaled a role for the Internet as supporting the research and educational community.
Originally, the researchers had wanted to use a high-speed, satellite-based communications system, but they had to settle for a data network called NSFNET, which presently transmits information at 56,000 bits per second.
NASDAQ: JNPR), the leader in high-performance networking, today announced its participation in a celebratory event that will recognize the impact and achievements of the National Science Foundation's NSFNET program.