Arpanet

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Arpanet

The first digital network that utilized packet switching, which is the transmission of data, regardless of content, in manageable chunks called packets. This was a revolutionary technology and ultimately led to the creation of the modern Internet. It was developed in the 1960s by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the IETF was gaining members and prominence in the late 1980s, it was also becoming increasingly clear that ARPANET, NSFNET, and other networks were growing beyond their research-oriented roots, gaining a broader user community and attracting increased commercial interest.
1993, NSFNET solicited bids from firms to build a nationwide backbone
link rate (Mbps) delay (ms) 0 1 155 4 0 9 310 4 1 2 155 4 2 3 310 4 3 4 155 4 4 5 310 4 5 6 155 4 6 7 310 4 7 8 155 4 8 9 310 Table 3: Link parameters for the nonhomogeneous NSFNET topology.
1, 19-20 (2001) (noting that the NSF and the NSFNet "community" created a new architecture for managing interconnection services); Jay P.
The NSFNET backbone at the top of the hierarchy was replaced by a series of private backbone providers that interconnected with one another at four public network access points established by the National Science Foundation.
Apart from NSFNet there is a number of other networks used by government and he business sector.
Each had computing power that exceeded most of the mainframes of the previous decade, and some of them were networked together and to the NSFnet.
Internet technology began with government-funded networking efforts, including the National Science Foundation's NSFNET, that now matured and spurred vast commercial development.
During the 1980s, ARPA cooperated with the National Science Foundation, which through a lot of volunteer labor created CSNet and then NSFNET, the backbone of the modern Internet.
1986 NSFNET, with a backbone speed of 56 Kbps, is created (Zakon 2002).
El caso frances de Minitel y le plan cable fue un total fracaso, las muy sofisticadas redes francesas del conjunto Renater y las estadounidenses Bitnet y Nsfnet son calificadas como "catedrales en el desierto".