National Labor Relations Act

(redirected from NLRA)
Also found in: Acronyms.

National Labor Relations Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1935, that protects workers from employer retaliation if they form a labor union. It prohibits employers from coercing employees into refraining from organizing. It also prohibits employers from discriminating against employees who argue publicly in favor or against organizing and requires companies to negotiate with employee representatives. It requires each unit of employees to be represented only by one organization. The Act created the National Labor Relations Board, which investigates and enforces potential violations. It is also called the Wagner Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
The NLRA was remarkable in introducing a legal regime; a system of governance for resolving bitter disputes over the efforts of workers to secure representation and bargain with their employers.
Along with enabling unionization and collective bargaining to establish rights for employees and employers, the NLRA also defines those rights that may be bargained for in the workplace.
that the employer's policy violated section 7 of the NLRA.
35) The Eighth Circuit overturned the NLRB's administrative decision by holding that requiring employees to resolve disputes exclusively through individual arbitration does not violate the NLRA.
33) And although the NLRA has undergone multiple amendments since its adoption in 1935, (34) the aforementioned provisions have remained unchanged (35) and continue to play an important role in the ongoing debate over the enforceability of collective action waivers.
AFSCME, 4 FPER 14168 (1978), PERC adopted virtually verbatim from an NLRB case under the NLRA a "duty of fair representation" owed by a Florida public-sector union to its public employee bargaining unit members under F.
31) The claim that worker centers are "labor organizations" under the NLRA attempts to divorce labor law's quid from its quo--to impose the extraordinary restrictions of federal labor law on voluntary associations of workers that neither exercise nor claim the special privileges and powers of unions.
Different from the Latin American reasons for protection, which are based on the defense of workers' dignity and safeguarding them from dehumanization when locked in unequal bargaining relationships with employers, protection in the NLRA is instrumental to safeguard industrial peace and interstate commerce, or, some would argue, the market.
In the 79 years since the passage of the NLRA, a variety of social and policy issues have converged to dilute both workers' opportunities to join unions and the power wielded by existing unions in the United States.
In recent years, the NLRB has prioritized NLRA enforcement actions involving social media.
I continue to believe that, under the NLRA, good jobs are union-free jobs.
The NLRA applies to most private-sector employers and their employees--whether unionized or not.