National Labor Relations Act

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National Labor Relations Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1935, that protects workers from employer retaliation if they form a labor union. It prohibits employers from coercing employees into refraining from organizing. It also prohibits employers from discriminating against employees who argue publicly in favor or against organizing and requires companies to negotiate with employee representatives. It requires each unit of employees to be represented only by one organization. The Act created the National Labor Relations Board, which investigates and enforces potential violations. It is also called the Wagner Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although these statistics should not be construed as a blanket indictment of all employers, it is clear that the inequality of bargaining power that prompted passage of the NLRA has returned with a vengeance.
Those in related jobs, such as packinghouses, processing and trucking, would be subject to the NLRA.
Under Section 8c of the NLRA, an employer may lawfully furnish accurate information in response to employees' questions if it does so without making threats or promises of benefits.
Although legally permissible in principle, any communications with employees could become illegal if the employer uses them to either threaten or interfere with employees' rights under the NLRA.
An employer that discharges or disciplines that employee does so at its peril, as doing so may violate the NLRA.
In its decision, the court deferred to the NLRB for further determination and clarification concerning three of the requirements of supervisory status under Section 2(11) of the NLRA.
their rights under the NLRA (91) to engage in "concerted
9) KRCC refused to bargain with the union because it objected to the inclusion of the RNs in the bargaining unit on the grounds that they were "supervisors" excluded from the protection of the NLRA.
Finally, one of the least appreciated aspects of labor law is that the protections of the NLRA apply even to employees who are not members of unions.
These arrangements were enshrined in the private sector via passage of the NLRA, during the "New Deal" administration of President Franklin Roosevelt.
The NLRB has revitalized itself by, among other things, finding many workplace policies to be "overly broad" and, thus, in violation of the NLRA.