National Bureau of Economic Research

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National Bureau of Economic Research

A private organization that conducts research into how the American economy works. Its goal is to provide non-partisan analysis to policymakers, businesspersons, academics, and the wider public. NBER divides its research into four main components: the development of new ways to make statistical measurements, estimating quantitative data on economic behavior, researching possible effects of policy proposals, and researching the effects of policy alternatives. It is particularly well-known for chronicling the beginning and end dates of American recessions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Olken, MIT and NBER; Rohini Pande, Harvard University and NBER, "Government Workers in Developing Countries"
Williams, MIT and NBER, "Intellectual Property Rights and Innovation: Evidence from Health Care Markets" (NBER Working Paper No.
Hamming Fang, University of Pennsylvania and NBER; Quanlin Gu and Li-An Zhou, Peking University; and Wei Xiong, Princeton University and NBER, "Demystifying the Chinese Housing Boom" (NBER Working Paper No.
Anne Case and Angus Deaton, Princeton University and NBER, "Suicide, Age, and Wellbeing: an Empirical Investigation" (NBER Working Paper No.
Christopher Timmins, Duke University and NBER, and Ashley Vissing, Duke University, "Valuing Leases for Shale Gas Development"
Warnock, University of Virginia and NBER, "The Two Components of International Capital Flows"
Callen, Harvard University; Bruno Ferman, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Rio de Janeiro); Ali Hasanain, Lahore University of Management Sciences; and Noam Yuchtman, University of California, Berkeley, and NBER, "Identifying Ideology: Experimental Evidence on AntiAmericanism in Pakistan"
Randall Akee, University of California, Los Angeles, and Emilia Sitneonova, Johns Hopkins University and NBER, "How Does Household Income Affect Child Personality Traits and Behaviors?
Keith Marzilli Ericson, Boston University and NBER, and Amanda Starc, University of Pennsylvania and NBER, "Measuring Consumer Valuation of Limited Provider Networks"
Austin Nichols, the Urban Institute, and Jesse Rothstein, University of California, Berkeley and NBER, "The Earned Income Tax Credit"
Jimmy Charite, Columbia University, and Raymond Fisman and Ilyana Kuziemko, Columbia University and NBER, "Reference Points and Demand for Redistribution: Experimental Evidence"
Atif Mian, Princeton University and NBER, and Amir Sufi, University of Chicago and NBER, "House Price Gains and U.