Mustard Gas


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Mustard Gas

A chemical made from sulfur that causes blisters on human skin. It has been used in chemical warfare since World War I. See also: Chemical Weapons Convention.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said that it was likely that ISIS carried out this recent attack in Marea, as they were known to have committed a similar attack recently, and that they could have a "lot more" mustard gas in reserve, a weapon which he called the "ultimate terror weapon.
Data Presented at NIH CounterACT Conference Supports Compound's Potential as a Countermeasure for Mustard Gas Exposure
At least 40,000 troops were injured or killed by exposure to sulfur mustard and mustard gas in the Iran-Iraq War, he said.
Penclawdd and Whiteford Sands were used for testing ordnance including mustard gas, a chemical warfare agent, during WWII.
Khateri said the government had registered at least 55,000 survivors of Iraqi chemical attacks, 7,000 of them civilians, but the true figure was higher because many people exposed to low levels of mustard gas only developed symptoms years later.
officials recently discovered that possibly thousands of mustard gas containers may have been contaminated by mercury, and the Army now must find ways to prevent the mercury from being released into the atmosphere when the mustard is destroyed.
Saddam was a great guy to the Americans when he was compliant and his requests for mustard gas and all sorts of weapons were supplied.
Remediation specialist Code has won a million pound contract to clean up a former mustard gas factory near Bristol.
Naranjo, a Vietnam veteran who became a renowned sculptor; Alfred Pugh, a 108-year-old World War I veteran who suffered lifelong disabilities resulting from mustard gas exposure during the Meusse-Argonne offensive; and Felecia Weston, a Gulf War veteran wounded in a SCUD missile attack who has dedicated herself to helping other disabled veterans as a DAV National Service Officer.
Chemical retaliatory plans during World War II called for using mustard gas (H) and phosgene (CG) aerial bombs (the most successful chemical agents used during World War I).
Waxman's Republican challenger Victor Elizalde pointed to the discovery of a mustard gas shell and a roadside bomb containing sarin nerve agent as proof that chemical shells do exist in Iraq.
The main chemicals found were mustard gas and an arsenic-based blistering agent called lewisite.