Muckraker


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Muckraker

A term for a journalist or other person who exposes corruption, especially in business or politics. The term has had both positive and negative connotations throughout its history. In the positive sense, muckrakers are thought to champion truth by exposing corruption. In the negative sense, the term connotes a person who is willing to compromise truth for a good story. That is, some muckrakers may exaggerate or in some cases simply make up their allegations.
References in periodicals archive ?
More ambitious still is the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, a network of more than 160 muckrakers from 61 countries around the world.
However, as with all muckrakers, readers must be wary of innuendos and not let interpretations pass as facts.
He then pretended to speak to Guru-Murthy, 45, and said: "You are a bottomfeeding ROW Downey Jr & Guru-Murthy, right muckraker.
Driving Licence To Kill (Alan McLean), All The Money In The World Is Not Enough (Barry McCallum), Golden Aye That'll Be Right, There's No Way You're Going To The Pub Tonight (Stevie Newton), On Her Majesty's Can You Keep A Secret Service, Muckraker, The Man With The Golden Credit Card (Mike Tomenson), Gold-digger (John Bruce).
Neverthe less, the former telly muckraker was the first to be voted out.
Anderson sort of adapted muckraker Sinclair Lewis' novel "Oil
2nd later, the muckraker wins-only to learn that a computer voting error gave him the victory.
1934 California business interests declared war on Upton Sinclair, the socialist muckraker turned Democratic gubernatorial nominee.
The uncle of one who was accused called military muckraker David Hackworth, who called "60 Minutes II.
Meryl Streep plays real-life muckraker and whistle-blower Karen Silkwood in Mike Nichols' and Nora Ephron's taut drama about a nuclear industry worker who dies mysteriously while preparing to leak information about risks of contamination at her Oklahoma plant