Motto


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Motto

A saying inscribed on a coin, especially but not necessarily the official motto of a country. For example, all American coins are inscribed with "In God We Trust," the motto of the United States.
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10) In a letter to Pollock on 9 December 1863, Chase responded positively to the recommendations, adding the following guidance: "I approve your mottoes, only suggesting that on that with the Washington obverse the motto should begin with the word `Our,' so as to read, `Our God and our country.
The doubling of the narration of the raid is thus like the proliferating mottos on the Oven: Since no single text, version, or interpretation is adequate, the novel opens up the actuality and the potentiality for multiple perspectives of author, characters, and, Morrison assumes, readers.
What appears most likely is that Henry's 'Grugge so woll' and Boleyn's 'groigne qui groigne' have their roots in the Burgundian court of love presided over by Margaret of Austria, Regent of the Netherlands, who employed the motto 'Groigne qui groigne et vive Burgoigne'.
If I had any doubt about the need of many states for a professional hand at motto making, it evaporated when, shortly after the Meese hearings, I saw a new license plate from Pennsylvania.
In the National Motto decision, the court ruled that Michael Newdow, who brought the challenge, "did not and cannot cite a single Supreme Court case that called into question the motto's constitutionality.
Police departments' timing in using the motto is suspicious, she added.
The nice part of this motto is it creates discussion.
262:27-c, 263:1, insofar as these required displaying the state motto on their vehicle license plates, and made it a criminal offense to obscure the motto.
The question of what religious symbols or mottos belong on public property has long been controversial.
There is also the possibility one motto will be chosen to become "concrete" and placed somewhere in St Helens.
The words we chose as our motto brought us together and provided us comfort - and not just a few of us, but all of us.
Congress passed a law declaring "In God We Trust" the country's official motto in 1956, and the measure was signed into law by President Dwight D.