Ethics

(redirected from Moral questions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then, with that identification in hand, move on to the moral questions.
Moral questions, which can be said to be the root of political debates, are often catalysed by one's religious inclinations.
Same-sex marriage has raised serious moral questions, but what about the problems it creates for the rules of protocol?
In the stories of travel in this issue of the Quarterly, the power of literature resides in the moral questions that are always part of such histories.
Choices are made; moral questions and dilemmas emerge.
Apart from the moral questions whether it be about abortion, women in the Church or homosexuality, what of the issues of HIV/AIDS?
Perhaps the most refreshing aspect of the film is that it does not get bogged down in the moral questions of abortion and is more concerned with the general plight of women in 1950s England.
Once a filmgoer can wrap his mind around the casting oddity, Solondz believes he can tap into the movie's moral questions over the consequences of taking action.
If nothing else, the results remind us that our citizenry is profoundly divided on the political and moral questions of our time.
The film also features interviews with potential patients and considers the surgical and moral questions surrounding the procedure, such as the psychological effect of having someone else's appearance and the likely reaction of the donor's family if they meet the recipient of their former loved one's face.
In anticipating our discussion of Christian views of same-sex behavior, it is significant for students to begin to take the step from the particular identification that there is no single "Hindu" response to ecology, to the universal recognition that different persons within the same tradition often have conflicting responses to moral questions.