Moore's Law


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Moore's Law

In technology, a theory stating that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit doubles every 18 months. Moore's Law was first articulated by George Moore, who co-founded Intel, in 1965. His original statement was that the doubling occurred every 12 months, but the pace has not been that fast for some time. Nevertheless, Moore's Law is expected to apply until at least 2017, when physical limitation is predicted to force the rate of development to slow.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, shrinking manufacturing beyond this will require the use of different materials, which means that sooner or later, Moore's law will become obsolete.
Do you think Moore's Law has been slowed down because of the physical limitations to increasing the number of transistors per chip?
We have accomplished nothing less than amazing results, all in the pursuit of keeping up with Moore's Law and all it represents.
Even Moore's Law, it seems, is subject to the Law of Diminishing Returns.
This change in the basic structure is a truly revolutionary approach, and one that should allow Moore's Law, and the historic pace of innovation, to continue.
But eventually physics was going to catch up with Moore's law.
But, if AMD haven't got Moore's law either, what future does technology have?
Now, Moore's Law has mainly been used to highlight the rapid change in commercial information processing technologies.
Moore's Law and Gilder's Law taken together show that general-purpose processors cannot handle future demands for TCP/IP packet processing.
Using Moore's Law (Intel co-founder Gordon Moore's prognostication that the computing speed of microprocessors doubles every 18 months), I can predict with reasonable certainty how many transistors we'll have on a chip in the next 20 years,'' said William Wulf, head of the National Academy of Engineers.
The transition to 3-D Tri-Gate transistors sustains the pace of technology advancement, fueling Moore's Law for years to come.
Strongest '15 sector growth opportunities lie in sensors technology, Big Data applications and medical end market; longer term, executives cite robotics, biometrics, autotech as most important drivers; Moore's Law in question