Moonlighting


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Moonlighting

The act or practice of taking a second or third job in order to make extra money. Moonlighting may or may not be related to one's actual career. For example, one may wait tables at a restaurant in the evenings even though one's main job is teaching. Moonlighting may be temporary; for instance, one may use the extra money to pay for a trip and then leave the second job.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the magnitude of moonlighting and the policy implications that its cyclicality may have for the functioning of the labor market, we examine the responsiveness of male and female multiple-job holding to business cycles.
There is often the presumption that moonlighting is countercyclical.
BLUE MOON: Bruce Willis and Cybill Shepherd in the 80s hit TV series Moonlighting
A moonlighting rate of 5-6% is a significant portion of the workforce, however there is reason to believe that this is a gross underestimate.
Moonlighting is a pervasive and international phenomenon.
Opponents to the practice of moonlighting cite a number of disadvantages:
Marital status had a clear effect on the reasons reported for moonlighting.
Speak directly with your personnel manager and discuss the company's policy concerning moonlighting.
It accuses LAPD Officer David Mack and others of moonlighting as ``covert agents'' for Death Row Records, which was being investigated for multiple crimes of violence.
Plus, there is no central office - a Moonlighting Department, if you will - to ensure that the employees are not abusing the system by using telephones, faxes and computers or making court appearances on city time.
Unlike other major cities, there is no central oversight of moonlighting in Los Angeles.
Moonlighting usually means holding down two jobs at once, traditionally one full-time job and one part-time job.