monopoly profit

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monopoly profit

the long-term ABOVE-NORMAL PROFIT accruing to a monopolist. See MONOPOLY.
References in periodicals archive ?
27) Double marginalization occurs when one firm with market power sells to a second firm with market power, and each sets its optimal monopoly price independently.
13) Cross-subsidization and transfer pricing require that misallocated costs of competitive services or higher prices of unregulated inputs be passed on to customers, causing the price to rise closer to the monopoly price.
As a result, the manufacturer earns T-V in profit from charging the monopoly price for its parts.
However, it doesn't follow for two reasons that any rise in the future price to points above cost is necessarily a monopoly price, implying the collection of monopoly rents over time.
But even then, its service will not be priced at the monopoly price.
361-362): "Let us illustrate margin monopoly by referring to its most frequent instance in present-day conditions, the power of a protective tariff to generate a monopoly price under special circumstances.
It also contained a competitive versus monopoly price framework which included perfect competition.
That is to say, Hayek differentiates the circumstance where a monopolist can only take a monopoly profit at a monopoly price from the circumstance where a monopolist can discriminate prices and take the maximum profit.
2] for the other drug must be: (1) the monopoly price, p; (2) the "over-price," that is, the highest [p.
The Monopoly Price Restrictions Act amended laws on district heating, electricity market, water and sewage, and the penal code.
At the same time, [section] 1 does not prevent the exercise of such power to "force" consumers to pay a monopoly price for the tying product.
But unfortunately, precisely because there is no output reduction in response to monopoly price increases, health insurance both amplifies the redistributive effects of provider and supplier monopolies and inflicts allocative inefficiencies that are arguably more distortive and costly than those caused by typical monopolists.