Monitor

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Monitor

To seek information about an agent's behavior; a device that provides such information.
References in periodicals archive ?
Heathrow Airport staff were shocked to see a monitor lizard freely wandering around the Terminal 4 baggage area this past week, illegal wildlife tracking officials say.
It was reported that the medicine contains the saliva of the monitor lizard and could help cure diabetes.
The 100- acre Udhyaan shelters 40 neelgais, several peacocks, rabbits and monitor lizards.
Summary: Slim, and rather sedate looking monitor lizards embellish the walls of Shivavilas Palace--in sculptures of course
In nature, nearly 90 per cent of all baby crocs struggle for survival as they are eaten by large fish, monitor lizards and other predators.
He said monitor lizards are non-poisonous reptiles and people should not be afraid of them.
The mangrove habitat supports the single largest population of tigers in the world which have adapted to an almost amphibious life, being capable of swimming for long distances and feeding on fish, crab and water monitor lizards.
The world's largest monitor lizards, they can grow up to three metres and weigh up to 70 kilograms (154 pounds).
Exotic pets including bearded dragons, monitor lizards and a royal python all needed a place to stay when last week's floods forced people to evacuate an estate in Newburn.
Monitor Lizards are threatened due to their large scale exploitation for skin trade.
Doing its part to increase the population of the endangered sea turtle population, the Bintan Conservation Lab relocates the eggs to keep them safe from predators such as monitor lizards.
Located by a section of the Luangwa river, a prime location for some of the biggest predators in Zambia, the hippo will have been in the sights of the notoriously vicious honey badger, leopards, lions, Nile crocodiles, hyenas, wild dogs, baboons, monitor lizards and marabou storks: known as the 'undertaker birds' and which use their 10-foot wingspan to swoop down and see off other smaller vultures.