Nanotechnology

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Related to Molecular manufacturing: Molecular nanotechnology

Nanotechnology

The technology that controls products at the atomic or molecular state. Nanotechnology has uses in information technology, heavy industry and energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Exponential general-purpose molecular manufacturing means a manufacturing system--a nanofactory--capable of making a wide range of technologically advanced products, far superior to what we have today, much cheaper, much faster, and able to multiply its own source of production exponentially.
He suggests that once a country developed the capability for molecular manufacturing using nanoassemblers, it would lose its incentive to trade.
In molecular manufacturing, the making of the material and the making of the component [are] one and the same," says Drexler, who helped develop the simulated bearings.
An early plan for molecular manufacturing imagined lots of free-floating assemblers working together to build a single massive product, molecule by molecule.
And then finally, when those various techniques and pathways had been refined to the point where the goal of molecular manufacturing was actually within reach, nanotechnology would appear as a huge and attainable boon; this was premise three.
Molecular manufacturing will dwarf the Industrial Revolution.
David Forrest, Naval Surface Warfare Centre and Institute for Molecular Manufacturing, USA
from the Institute for Molecular Manufacturing, George Schatz from Northwestern University, and Erik Winfree and Paul W.
Eric Drexler and Christine Peterson, Foresight dedicates itself to providing education, policy development, and networking to maximize benefits and minimize downsides of molecular manufacturing.
These prizes recognize researchers whose recent work has most advanced the field toward the achievement of Feynman's vision for nanotechnology: molecular manufacturing, defined as the construction of atomically-precise products through the use of molecular machine systems.
The Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB; The Institute for Molecular Manufacturing (IMM); The Johns Hopkins University; Tsinghua University; UCLA; University of Akron; University of Bordeaux; University of Buffalo; University of Chicago; University of Houston; University of Massachusetts Lowell; University of Melbourne; University of Michigan; University of South Florida; University of Texas at Austin; University of Toronto; University of York
With nanoscale fabrication and molecular manufacturing gaining popularity, the cost of many such devices is expected to fall, leading to increase in volume and market growth.
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