Mixed bag


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Mixed bag

Used in the context of general equities. Group of stocks which consists of some which are up, down, and neutral.

Mixed Bag

An informal term for a group of securities, some of which are trading above their opening prices, some of which are trading below them, and some that are trading roughly at their opening prices.
References in periodicals archive ?
ABOTAC Christmas fayre match saw 16 out of 38 find a few mixed bags of cod, pollack, pouting, flounders, and dabs.
In their next match at Parkers Match Pool at Bulkington, Mark Willock was the winner with a 24-12-0 mixed bag taken on pole and paste, with Ben Lockwood once again second with 20-08-0, just four ounces ahead of John Oldham.
It's how we deal with the mixed bag that determines how we view and perform our work.
It has been a mixed bag for the tourism industry this summer as numbers start filtering in through business industries directly linked to the market.
December 2001 - Consumers' Research magazine published the CA column "Trade Meeting Mixed Bag for Consumers" by Barbara Rippel.
Underscoring the urgency of the situation is the bill's mixed bag of supporters, among them: AAHSA, the American Health Care Association, the American Nurses Association, the Service Employees International Union and the National Citizens' Coalition for Nursing Home Reform.
The national pastime is a mixed bag for broadcasters this year.
If you go for loud and thrashy, bank on this mixed bag of tricks.
The instructions make for a mixed bag of practices which will prove detrimental to the Church in Quebec.
This decision is a decidedly mixed bag," observed Americans United Executive Director Barry W.
The International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers forecasts for synthetic rubber consumption in Western and Central Europe, the Commonwealth of Independent States and the Middle East and Africa for the five-year period, 1998-2002 shows a mixed bag of predictions.
Wasserstein would respond that life for European Jewry since 1945 has been a mixed bag, with liberalism having, paradoxically, both positive and negative effects.