Miller-Tydings Fair Trade Act

(redirected from Miller Tydings Fair Trade Act of 1937)

Miller-Tydings Fair Trade Act

Legislation in the United States that allows manufacturers or distributors of goods to require retailers to charge a minimum price. The Act was designed to protect small retailers who were being driven out of business by large chains who could undercut prices, especially using loss leader strategies. The Act was passed in 1937 and was repealed in 1975. See also: Consumer Goods Pricing Act.