Impairment

(redirected from Mild cognitive impairment)
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Impairment

Reduction in the value of an asset because the asset no longer generates the benefits expected earlier as determined by the company through periodic assessments. This could happen because of changes in market value of the asset, business environment, government regulations, etc.

Impairment

A reduction in a company's working capital as a result of a loss on an investment or a distribution (such as a coupon or dividend) to investors.

impairment

Reduction in a firm's capital as a result of distributions or losses.
References in periodicals archive ?
It also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development for Mild cognitive impairment and special features on late-stage and discontinued projects.
Editor's Note: Those with mild cognitive impairment also experienced better test scores in association with vitamins B2, B6, and folate, although the number of tests that showed improvements was fewer than that of the Alzheimer's disease group.
Emma's study aims to improve the characterisation of vascular-related mild cognitive impairment and vascular dementia compared to healthy ageing, with respect to signs, symptoms, behaviour and quality of life, and to investigate changes in brain function in vascular-related mild cognitive impairment that may help to better determine when it represents the early stages of vascular dementia.
For every 1% increase in the 1-year rate of hippocampal atrophy, patients with mild cognitive impairment experienced significant declines in the MMSE, audio verbal learning test, immediate memory, category fluency, and trail making.
Four years into the study, 200 of the 940 were beginning to show mild cognitive impairment, problems with memory, language, thinking and judgment that are greater than normal age-related changes.
Alzheimer's Society research manager Anne Corbett said: "The study will look at the role chronic stress plays in the progression from mild thinking and memory problems - mild cognitive impairment - to Alzheimer's disease.
A spokesman from the charity said: "Increasing our understanding of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) could help us unravel the many mysteries still surrounding Alzheimer's disease and move us closer to treatments and a cure.
Mild cognitive impairment, often a precursor to Alzheimer's disease, is a condition in which people have problems with memory or thinking beyond that explained by the normal rate of aging.
Each year, 10 to 15 percent of individuals with mild cognitive impairment develop dementia, as compared with 1 percent to 2 percent of the general population.
People with mild cognitive impairment appear to be functioning normally, but their forgetfulness is beyond what occurs in normal aging.
They found that almost 14% of participants had mild cognitive impairment, 10% were suffering from dementia, and 76% had normal mental faculties.
Annual conversion rates [from mild cognitive impairment to dementia] often range from 10 percent to 15 percent in clinic samples.