Metric

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Metric

A standard unit of measurement, such as the price to earnings ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
Martina Huss, Usha Goswami and colleagues gave a group of 10-year-old children, with and without dyslexia, a listening task involving short tunes that had simple metrical structures with accents on certain notes.
Hence, the metrical structure of the genitive singular assumes a greater role in identifying class outside the first declension.
The metrical structure of Takituduh is not constrained syllabically either, since [FTBIN.
This enables the performer to give an individual interpretation of a folk song without any restriction from constant pulse or metrical structure.
Although the content of Page's sonnet to Rives is slight, the metrical structure and stanzaic form are of some interest.
Meter thus grows organically from out of the idea; metrical structure might be understood as an exoskeleton that forms to encapsulate an already living organism.
The two forms have different metrical structure in the attested forms; *([?
We base our analysis of metrical structure directly on the prosodic hierarchy (Selkirk 1978, 1980, 1981, 1986, 1995; Nespor and Vogel 1982, 1986; Hayes 1989) and assume that metrical structure bears a strict relation to the prosodic structure of natural language (Jakobson 1933, 1952; Kiparsky 1975, 1977; Nespor and Vogel 1986: chapter 10; Hayes 1989; Helsloot 1995, 1997; Golston and Riad 1997; Golston 1998).
116) - may prove to be a stumbling block for readers who understand ambiguity as enriching rather than disrupting a hierarchic metrical structure.
Most practitioners are happy for their investigations of texts to be framed by traditional literary categories such as point of view, metrical structure, and metaphor; and where the range of literary concepts has been extended by ideas from linguistics and related fields, e.
His book, Rethinking Meter, brings charge after charge against traditional prosodists who hear in lines of most English verse before 1900 a distinct metrical structure.