McCain-Feingold Act

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McCain-Feingold Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 2002, that changed the way that campaigns for federal political offices are financed. It banned soft money contributions, which were unregulated, usually large, contributions to the national party committees, instead of individual candidates. It also required political advertisements to state what person or group paid for them.
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Currently the McCain-Feingold bill is once more stalled in Congress, making its annual bid for serious consideration before drifting again into the legislative limbo of committee negotiation.
They know you solely as the second name on the McCain-Feingold bill.
The Senate passed the McCain-Feingold campaign finance legislation last April.
The McCain-Feingold bill contains some reforms for television ads--candidates have to appear in the last four seconds and proclaim that they endorse the message, for instance--but the basic fact of TV primacy is unchanged.
The passage of the Shays-Meehan bill, the House's version of the Senate's better-known McCain-Feingold bill, was seven years in the making.
would--like the McCain-Feingold bill that the Senate has passed--put the people's work back on the front burner in Congress by banning these soft-money contributions.
But support for the McCain-Feingold bill has grown.
In his 29-page-long opinion, Roberts offered a keen and analytical critique of the FEC and other parties supporting McCain-Feingold.
The consequence of the McCain-Feingold law is patent unfairness, Abrams argued.
The McCain-Feingold measure bans a range of interest groups, including those financed with corporate or union money and those failing to disclose their donors, from airing ads mentioning federal candidates in their districts the month before a primary and two months before a general election.
Close behind this difficult case will be a First Amendment dispute over the McCain-Feingold campaign-finance-reform bill, which a lower court challenged on May 2.
The 2002 McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform legislation was supposed to put an end to "soft money"--unregulated contributions that do not go to a candidate directly but to a third party that electioneers on the politician's behalf.