McCain-Feingold Act

McCain-Feingold Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 2002, that changed the way that campaigns for federal political offices are financed. It banned soft money contributions, which were unregulated, usually large, contributions to the national party committees, instead of individual candidates. It also required political advertisements to state what person or group paid for them.
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The justices struck down a Vermont law that sought to sharply restrict spending and contributions to state candidates, and they partly shielded nonprofit corporations from the McCain-Feingold Act and its ban on pre-election political ads.
The Supreme Court had knocked back a provision of the McCain-Feingold Act that prohibited all corporations and unions from broadcasting electioneering communications.
The McCain-Feingold Act of 2002 was an attempt to seal the cracks.
There he was tasked with enforcing the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, more commonly known as the McCain-Feingold Act.
That's due largely to the McCain-Feingold Act of 2002, which, as writer Gregory Millman notes, barred direct company contributions to federal candidates.
In these 12 essays with an introduction by Kerbel and a foreword by Howard Dean, some of the new movers and shakers describe the decline of progressivism and the new reasons to restart it, the causes of the general elections of 2004, the gender gap, the values dilemma, the art of seeking the common good, ways and means of crafting both policy and message without conflict or overlap, the infamous Section 527 loophole in the McCain-Feingold Act, communicating a progressive philosophy, teaching progressives to speak American, firing the consultants, and using technology for campaigns and political change.
But two years ago, the McCain-Feingold Act prohibited parties from raising soft money, a goal long sought by liberal newspaper editorialists and good-government activists.
How many supposedly pro-Gun politicians supported the McCain-Feingold Act which makes it illegal for gun rights groups to buy advertising criticizing a federal legislator for voting for gun control.
With Justice Sandra Day O'Connor in the majority, the court upheld the McCain-Feingold Act against a free-speech challenge by a 5-4 vote in 2003.
They also discuss how outside influences, such as the campaign reform movement and message politics affected the election, and focus on the ramifications of the McCain-Feingold Act.
Gingrich's decision to not engage in Presidential exploratory activity due to legal barriers imposed by the McCain-Feingold Act.