Mature economy

Mature economy

The economy of a nation with a stable population and slowing economic growth.

Mature Economy

A stable economy with low growth and generally low inflation. It especially refers to an economy with a stable population; that is, there are fewer pressures to create jobs for a larger workforce, but at the same time, there is enough growth for the economy to financially support retirees as they age and need more care. See also: Mature company.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, EAC has been dropping this proposal arguing that Kenya is a mature economy with citizens who can afford better cars,' said Mr Munyori.
It might be that consistent 2% growth is perfect for a big, strong, mature economy like ours.
Growth tends to allow an economy to more comfortably sustain a higher level of aggregate indebtedness than a slower-moving, more mature economy.
For a mature economy, those are quite high growth rates," Hackett said.
The definition of a mature economy states that it is characterized by equal productivity growth in all sectors of production--balanced growth.
She said: "While, like almost every mature economy, we have an ageing population, it is excellent to see the under-fives population has increased.
Mr Davies, whose firm played no role in the acquisition process said: "Acquiring it was a brave decision, but if we are a mature country with a mature economy then there must be easier international access.
A mature economy with a declining population, Japan, now the world's third-largest economy behind the US and China, is being eclipsed by its Asian neighbors.
Writers and speakers from the simplicity movement reflect on such topics as a cool lifestyle for a hot planet, religion and the earth, reclaiming a sense of time by taking back family life from overscheduling, culture as a guidepost for a balanced life, creating the educational foundations for change, a mature economy, and downshifting to a carbon-friendly economy.
Looking further at the 43 articles done previously, often, studies are still answering the "what" question either by testing established theories using emerging economy samples or by describing how an emerging economy entrepreneurship phenomenon differs from a mature economy.
Germany, the European Union's largest economy, will have addressed some of its structural problems after a strenuous political process, but as a mature economy its growth potential will not surpass 2 percent.
However, the mature economy of Japan will lag the global average of growth.