Married Taxpayer

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Married Taxpayer

A person who is legally married on the final day of a tax year (which is usually the calendar year). In the United States, a married taxpayer has the option of being married filing separately or married filing jointly, depending on which option offers the most tax advantages.
References in periodicals archive ?
For married taxpayers filing jointly: $100,000 on the last day of the year or $150,000 anytime during the year.
There is also the revival of the "Pease" limitation on itemized deductions and the personal exemption phase-out for taxpayers whose taxable income exceeds $250,000 for single taxpayers and $300,000 for married taxpayers.
That compares to $6,200 for single filers under 65 and $12,400 for married taxpayers under 65 who are filing jointly.
About 7 percent of married taxpayers deducted donations, double that of single taxpayers.
that exceeds $400,000 ($450,000 for married taxpayers filing a joint return) is subject to a new 39.
Same-sex couples can file federal returns as married taxpayers if they are legally married, rather than living together and unmarried.
the Equal Dignity for Married Taxpayers Act "sets new precedent by removing gender-specific references to marriage, enshrining dignity and recognition for LGBTQ Americans in the tax code," according to a Wyden press release.
250,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly or as a surviving spouse.
Married taxpayers with less than $44,000 in income or single taxpayers with less than $22,000 would pay no tax on Social Security benefits, indexed for inflation.
Also, the 15% rate bracket for married taxpayers filing jointly and qualifying widowers has expand ed to twice that of single fliers.
Seaborn, (1) allowed a form of "income-splitting" for married taxpayers who resided in community property states.