market maker

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Market maker

Used in the context of general equities. One who maintains firm bid and offer prices in a given security by standing ready to buy or sell round lots at publicly quoted prices. See: Agent, dealer, specialist.

Market Maker

A dealer available to trade a stated security on its own account at any time at the quoted price. The job of a dealer is to be a market maker in order to promote liquidity for a security. When a broker-dealer makes a market, it trades from its own inventory, which is easier and less expensive for an investor than looking for other brokerages willing to trade. Many exchanges designate a market maker for each of its listed securities to promote ease of trade.

market maker

1. One (as a person or firm) that, on a continuous basis, buys and sells a security for one's own account. Market makers usually try to profit from a rapid turnover in security positions rather than from holding those positions in anticipation of gradual price movements. Specialists on the organized exchanges and dealers in the over-the-counter market are market makers. See also make a market.
2. A dealer in options on the floor of an options exchange who makes a market in one or more options. The Chicago Board Options Exchange uses market makers.

Market maker.

A broker-dealer who is prepared to buy or sell a specific security -- such as a bond or at least one round lot of a stock -- at a publicly quoted price, is called a market maker in that security.

Other brokers buy or sell specific securities through market makers, who may maintain inventories of those securities.

There is often more than one market maker in a particular security, and they bid against each other, helping to keep the marketplace liquid.

The Nasdaq Stock Market and the corporate and municipal bond markets are market maker markets. In contrast, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) there's a single specialist to handle transactions in each security.

market maker

a firm attached to the STOCK MARKET which is engaged in the buying and selling of FINANCIAL SECURITIES such as STOCKS, SHARES and BONDS and thereby acts to establish a market PRICE for these securities. Market making firms in the UK have (since the 1986 stock market reforms) combined the roles of jobber (acting as a principal in the buying and selling of securities) and stockbroker (acting as an agent on behalf of clients wishing to sell or buy securities); although the stockbroking function is still performed by firms specialized in that activity alone.

A market making firm usually specializes in a small group of securities, for example the shares of companies in a particular industry The firm makes its profit out of the difference between the price at which it buys a security and the (higher) price at which it sells. The firm marks its buying and selling prices upwards or downwards according to whether its holding of a security is falling or increasing. For example, if there is a strong demand for a particular share, then as the firm sells some of its holdings it will mark the share price up to reflect its growing scarcity value. See BID PRICE, SHARE PURCHASE/SALE.

market maker

a firm attached to the STOCK EXCHANGE that is engaged in the buying and selling of FINANCIAL SECURITIES, such as STOCKS, SHARES and BONDS, and by so doing acts to establish a market for these securities. Market-making firms in the UK have (since the 1986 stock-market reforms) combined the roles of jobber (acting as aprincipal in the buying and selling of securities) and stockbroker (acting as an agent on behalf of clients wishing to sell or buy securities), although the stockbroking function is also still performed by firms specializing in that activity alone.

A market-making firm usually specializes in a small group of securities, for example, the shares of companies in a particular industry The firm makes its profit out of the difference between the ‘bid’ price at which it buys a security and the (higher) ‘offer’ price at which it sells. The firm marks its buying and selling prices upwards or downwards according to whether its holding of a security is falling or increasing. For example, if there is a strong demand for a particular share, then as the firm sells some of its holdings it will mark the share price up to reflect its growing security value. See BID PRICE, SHARE PURCHASE/SALE, DUAL CAPACITY, CHINESE WALL.

References in periodicals archive ?
In choppy markets, the market-maker truly has to act as a principal, buying or selling securities from inventory, rather than as a crossing agent between two parties who have, unbeknownst to them, agreed on a price.
Not surprisingly, the institutions most radically affected by the changes in the financial world will be broker/dealers, market-makers and the exchanges themselves.
Investors usually buy stock from or sell it to a market-maker in the stock, rather than another investor.
Not all brokerage firms like the plan, which could diminish the role of powerful market-makers in Nasdaq stocks.
lanelogic is the used-vehicle market-maker that uses real-time sales data to conduct electronic trading between automotive dealers nationwide.
Margin debt is extended in both these markets as well although heavily concentrated in options market-makers, while no market-maker composes a significant portion of debt outstanding.
Herzog Heine Geduld, established in 1926, is a member of the New York Stock Exchange and a leading Nasdaq market-maker, with average daily trading volume of more than 8% of Nasdaq's total daily share volume.
a leading NASDAQ market-maker, which makes markets in some 2,500 over the counter stocks.
continues to move forward on expansion projects despite the fact that its primary market-maker, Berkeley Securities Corporation, was closed by the National Association of Securities Dealers due to a capital deficiency.
The following institutions are market-makers in the index: Bank of America; Bear Stearns; Citigroup; Credit Suisse; Deutsche Bank; Goldman Sachs; JPMorgan; Lehman Brothers; Merrill Lynch; Morgan Stanley; Nomura International; RBS Greenwich Capital; UBS; and Wachovia.
Market-makers in the index at launch include the following: Bank of America; Barclays Capital; Bear Stearns; BNP Paribas; Citigroup; Credit Suisse; Deutsche Bank; Goldman Sachs; JPMorgan; Lehman Brothers; Merrill Lynch; Morgan Stanley; RBS Greenwich; UBS; and Wachovia.
Also, remember that some of the key rules or laws that govern "short interest" activity do not apply to market-makers.