Downturn

(redirected from Market Downturns)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Downturn

(1) A period of contraction or decline of economic activity, especially real GDP, but typically employment as well. (2) The transition of an economy from growth to contraction, also known as a peak of economic activity.

Downturn

A decline in a security or market, especially after a long bullish period. A downturn is considered an inevitable part of the business cycle. See also: Bear market.

downturn

A decline in security prices or economic activity following a period of rising or stable prices or activity. Even strong bull markets are subject to occasional downturns.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aton's strategy team does not believe the energy sector is defensive in nature as it looks less attractive than other sectors during market downturns (please see our strategy report When the Dust Settles: Positioning for a Rebound released 19 Aug 2011).
Phoenix's GMAB Rider gives investors comfort to make a long-term commitment to equities and helps reduce risk by providing protection through market downturns, while rewarding market performance with a credit.
Thus, the type of underwriting endorsed by the CMBS industry will determine whether or not hotel loans will be able to weather future market downturns.
polisher of ideal cut diamonds said: "We who hold diamond inventory have no financial instruments at our disposal to lay off risk, and thus no ability to profit from market downturns as well as upturns.
The most popular enhanced death benefit feature allows investors to periodically lock-in market gains, insuring against future market downturns.
Floating-rate transactions are inherently riskier than conduit pools because they often include transitional collateral and high leverage, they tend to have a high concentration of loans, and can have certificates tied to specific loans, making the ratings more vulnerable in market downturns," said Roy Chun, a managing director in Standard & Poor's Structured Finance Surveillance Group.