Mark-to-market


Also found in: Dictionary.

Mark-to-market

Adjustment of the book value or collateral value of a security to reflect current market value.

Mark to Market

To record a change in the value of an asset or fund to reflect its current fair market value. Marking to market occurs on a daily basis and is used for a number of purposes. Notably, investors mark to market a portfolio or security to ensure that a margin account is meeting its minimum maintenance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Calculation of Segment Profit and Operating Income Margins Excluding Pension Mark-to-Market Adjustment (Unaudited)
He emphasizes the importance of compiling financial statements on a monthly basis with proper mark-to-market entries, so clients understand not only what the numbers are, but what they mean.
Taxpayers that fall within the definition of a dealer in securities can apply the mark-to-market rules narrowly to inventoried securities only, very broadly to all securities owned (including those held for investment), or selectively to any specific security or group of securities.
According to Reuters, Goldman Sachs Group, Inc (NYSE: GS) and Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) are planning to reduce their use of mark-to-market accounting practices.
Under mark-to-market accounting, Honeywell uses the fair value of the plan's assets and recognizes the plan's gains and losses in the year they are incurred, instead of amortizing them over a period of years.
Net spread, the difference between basic lease rents and interest expense excluding the impact from the mark-to-market of interest rate caps, increased by 50% year-on-year to USD169.
It is a hot topic, but mark-to-market has had no effect on our company," Billings said.
At the hearing, the FASB said it would move quickly to issue a proposal on additional guidance for mark-to-market accounting.
For approximately 70 years after FDR's decision to suspend mark-to-market accounting, banks and credit unions operated without M2M and the economy didn't have the threat of another depression.
But in the reporting of results based on mark-to-market accounting and how perverted those results have become based on the devaluation of such things as mortgage-backed securities, the financial industry and the journalists who cover it may have fumbled the ball somewhat:
Real estate investors often use mark-to-market accounting -- which lawmakers are now looking to reform -- to assign a value to assets based on what the property could command on the market if it were sold today.
However, they might be more willing to do this after the mark-to-market features of accounting reform make the risk-reduction properties of a conservative asset allocation more apparent in the reported financials.