Manat


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Manat

A name for a currency in Central Asia. The currencies of both Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan are called the manat. In Azerbaijan, the Soviet ruble was called the manat locally.
References in periodicals archive ?
With currencies eroding around the edges in a number of countries such as Russia, China, Vietnam, Malaysia, and Kazakhstan, the Turkmen Manat will definitely come under pressure.
In Verses it is suggested that Shaitan, or the Devil (Satan), initially tricks Mahound (Muhammad) into suggesting that "Lat and Uzza, and Manat, the third, the other .
We maintained a stable exchange rate of the national currency - Manat.
The domestic market purchased food wheat and polymer granules totaling more than 262 thousand manat ($74.
We have been monitoring euro's depreciation to dollar on the international currency market in the last two days and it lead to the soft changes in the dollar's rate to manat.
Tabari, 17: 131-34, devotes most of his commentary on this verse to the reason for its revelation; it was sent down as a comfort to the prophet for having inadvertently, because of Satanic interference, spoken favorably of the pagan goddesses Allat, Uzza, and Manat.
4) The black market rate in early 2002 was around 20,000 manat per US dollar, compared to the official rate of 5,200.
But no matter what his team-mates might think of him, Matthaus is still THE top manat Bayern.
Manat Ali, defending, said Sinkevicius was not from England but had a driving licence in his home country where he had been driving since a very young age.
Cum enim proprium sit, quod omni convenit et soli et, sicut dicit Boethius, quod proprium de substantia manat et substantialibus, non est proprium hominis sentire et vegetari, sed solum intelligere.
The Azeri currency, called manat, is relatively less unstable and the country's GDP has been rising since 1996 after falling by two-thirds since 1989.
The date given in column 2 is when the national currency became sole legal tender, apart from Azerbaijan where the manat, introduced as a parallel currency in August 1992, had become the dominant currency by June 1993 when it was announced that it would be sole legal tender (Pomfret, 1996, 110-1), but a coup d'etat interrupted these plans and the manat became officially sole legal tender only on 1 January 1994.