Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act

(redirected from Magnuson-Moss Act)
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Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1975, that gave the Federal Trade Commission the authority to enforce warranties on consumer goods. The Act does not require goods to carry warranties, but rather states that companies must honor the warranties that they issue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kelly and Ellen Moore (1980), "Even After the Magnuson-Moss Act of 1975, Warranties Are Not Easy to Understand," The Journal of Consumer Affairs, 14 (Winter): 394-404.
The current process through which the FTC makes rules, as established by the Magnuson-Moss Act, is a proven and effective vehicle for the regulation of business and provides the Commission with enforcement authority to punish businesses that act in a deceptive manner or in ways that are unfair to the consumer.
The current process for FTC rulemaking is limited by the 35-year-old Magnuson-Moss Act.
When Congress passed the Magnuson-Moss Act in 1975, it recognized that a more transparent rulemaking process must temper the FTC's exceptionally broad regulatory powers over all forms of trade and commerce.
Pursuant to the Magnuson-Moss Act, use of EthosFR+ will not void the vehicle warranty.
This is in violation of federal law known as the Magnuson-Moss Act, passed in the 1970s, which prohibits repairs from being tied to warranties.
This is blatantly in violation of Federal Law known as the Magnuson-Moss Act, passed in the 1970s, which PROHIBITS WARRANTIES FROM BEING TIED TO REPAIRS.
GM's Vehicle Purchase Program, however, bars participants from suing under the Magnuson-Moss Act or Michigan's Lemon Law.
Given that Chrysler had only acknowledged the safety defects in the ABS, and issued the recalls, after it had been sued by consumers for just such a remedy, plaintiffs moved for attorneys' fees under the Magnuson-Moss Act, which authorizes consumers to commence civil actions for damages or other relief for the breach of any express or implied warranty or service contract by the provider of consumer goods and provides that the defendant may be ordered to pay attorneys' fees to the plaintiffs in the event that they prevail in the case.
If original equipment manufacturer's (OEM) products are not provided free of charge, the manufacturer must produce a Federal Trade Commission waiver exempting it from the conditions of the Magnuson-Moss Act.