Ma Bell


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Ma Bell

A colloquial term for AT&T prior to the 1980s. It was used to refer to the fact that AT&T had total or near total monopoly over the provision of telephone service in most areas of the United States. After 1984, Ma Bell was forcibly broken up into several "baby Bells."
References in periodicals archive ?
Its government-ordered breakup in 1982 removed local service from Ma Bell, leaving it with long distance, R&D and phone-equipment manufacturing.
Tenders are invited for 400 Ohms/20 Ma Bell Relay For Double Line Block Instrument As Per Drg.
Even as FairPoint Communications settled a long strike involving many of its line workers, the company made another move that says at least as much about the state of the telephone industry, preparing to turn part of their Manchester facility into a data center and push into a competitive business that has nothing to do with Ma Bell.
Exploding the Phone: The Untold Story of the Teenagers and Outlaws Who Hacked Ma Bell provides a lively survey of the tinkerers and pranksters who turned AT&T's telephone system into a joke.
Ma Bell once gave us the option of ending a call, shall we say, emphatically.
On behalf of our customers, our industry and our country, Sprint will fight this attempt by AT&T to undo the progress of the past 25 years and create a new Ma Bell duopoly," McCann's statement said.
Ma Bell is beginning to look like Ma Wi-Fi as the company expands its Wi-Fi efforts beyond a Wi-Fi test site in Times Square.
on a weekday, airfares were set by the government, the draft was alive and well, and hooking up an answering machine was a good way to incur the wrath of Ma Bell.
The long distance giants affirm their commitment to continue merging and merging and merging until they eventually coalesce into one single entity which they will rename Ma Bell.
The old Western Electric Ma Bell black phones lasted half a lifetime.
prompted rampant speculation that the old Ma Bell was being reassembled.
Just as in the old Ma Bell days when the higher margins from long-distance revenues subsidized the high costs of local service.