Master of Business Administration

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Master of Business Administration

A graduate degree that represents advanced study of business. An MBA shows that the recipient has completed theoretical, and perhaps also practical, coursework in how to manage a company, construct a business model, and generally run a business. A person holding an MBA ordinarily commands a much higher starting salary than one who does not, at least in finance, consulting, and a few other sectors.
References in periodicals archive ?
28-30 MBA Risk Management, Quality Assurance and Fraud
Manchester Business School recently launched a new, more intensive part time MBA programme which allows students to obtain their Global MBA in two years plus a six-month project - a total of 2.
Given this temptation, how big of a problem is ghostwriting according to the MBA admissions?
About 30 percent of full-time MBA programs reported an increase in international applications, compared with 18 percent in 2004.
Short courses and continuing education programs fill an important need for most professionals, but students who immerse themselves in an MBA program while working fulltime have a chance to really explore these subjects in a unique way.
Thus, it is probably more appropriate for an MBA program then an undergraduate program.
Although sharing a language and cultural roots represents a remarkable plus for Latin American students when it comes to opting for Spain, it isn't the only or most important reason for it, explained Alberto Arribas, MBA admissions director at the IESE Business School.
Jack Siegel, professor of the Management Skills Development course, emphasizes the importance of communication and other "soft skills" at the MBA level.
According to MBA, in most cases lenders including banks, thrift institutions, and other funding sources, require a minimum level of owner occupancy to underwrite a first underlying mortgage (the financing that encumbers the building) and to finance an individual share loan (the loan on a specific unit).
On the flip side, MBA programs also have come under criticism for a "ready, fire, aim" approach to curriculum development.