Lusophone


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Related to Lusophone: Hispanophone

Lusophone

A person, company or country for which Portuguese is the primary language. While it is not as important in international commerce as English or French, it is the fifth most spoken language in the world and has official status in nine countries.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have personally been interested in literature from the other Africa --Francophone, Lusophone and the Maghreb.
Whereas France, for instance, is still a center for the French-speaking world, the Lusophone regions seem to be less focused on one specific center, and to spread across different continents.
As an important member of the CPLP, the Minister of Education and Sport of Cape Verde and the DGD will play an important role in promoting the importance of sport security and integrity within the vast community of Portuguese-language countries, as well as introducing crucial measures that will protect young athletes and fans, not just in Cape Verde, but across wider CPLP and Lusophone countries"
Taking Mozambique in East Africa and Guinea-Bissau in East Africa as representatives of the five-country Lusophone (Portuguese-speaking) Africa, Figueira (U.
festival, celebrating Spanish and Lusophone (Portuguese speaking) cultures, gears up.
While historically focused on resources in French, ARS today serves all of Africa, including Anglophone and Lusophone posts.
Festival, which celebrates Latin, Spanish and Lusophone cultures, is now in its 7th year.
com)-- Headquartered in Portugal, CMC aims at developing a significant share of its business activities in international markets, especially in Portuguese-speaking countries like Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde and Mozambique, strengthening lusophone relations.
Her Revista promoted the inter-disciplinary study of Africa, and in particular of Lusophone Africa.
The emphasis, says the IFC, will be on providing advisory services to public and private sector partners in the Lusophone countries to help improve the investment climate, promote the growth of small and medium enterprises, and support access to finance and infrastructure development.
Consolidating these developments, the journal will now move towards completion of the planned changes with an expansion of the editorial team and the introduction of a review section, as well as the occasional publication of guest-edited theme issues by which to better reflect the wide-ranging geographic, temporal and disciplinary scope of Lusophone Studies, a field itself changing beyond recognition.
Practitioners of non-Christian religions included approximately 35,000 Muslims (largely from sub-Saharan Lusophone Africa and South Asia), approximately 700 Jews, and a very small population of Buddhists, Taoists, and Zoroastrians.