Luddites


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Related to Luddites: Amish, Chartists, Fabians

Luddite

A term for workers in the early 19th century in Britain who opposed the Industrial Revolution because increased mechanization was changing the economy and leaving them without jobs. The term has come to mean any person who opposes technological changes, especially those that impact the economy.

Luddites

workers who destroyed labour-saving machinery in 19th-century England to try to prevent machines from taking over their jobs. Nowadays the term is used to describe anyone who resists technological development.
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In contrast, the only thing the Luddites really did, despite their fervent attempt to ignore their changing world, was get their names into the dictionary.
Wendell Berry responds: In his letter, Professor Lewontin says, "I did not speak of Vandana Shiva's allies as Luddites.
The band of Luddites, named for apprentice Ned Ludd, were fiercely opposed to changes taking place in the textiles industry that moved production from the homes of individual loom operators to factories where giant machines were staffed by shifts of workers.
In other words, we might be wise to take an exploratory, rather than Luddite, view.
Microsoft lead attorney John Warden said, "We firmly believe the Court will conclude after hearing all the evidence that this is not really an antitrust case, but a return of the Luddites - the 19th Century reactionaries who, fearful of competition, went around smashing machines with sledgehammers to arrest the march of progress driven by science and technology.
Dave Hazell, of computer firm Intel, said: "Despite what we read, we are not a nation of Luddites.
During the Industrial Revolution a group of people known as the Luddites began fighting against mechanical progress.
The Luddites were textile workers who rose up and smashed the new knitting machines and powered cotton looms that were being installed in British factories.
The Luddites were organized bands of English workers who, from 1811 to 1816, destroyed manufacturing equipment because they believed that machines took away jobs.
hosted by huddersfield Local history Society and the University of huddersfield history Department, the lecture entitled, York Castle and its political prisoners: the Luddites in a broader context, is on Thursday, April 16, at 7.
About the same time that I was learning about Luddites, I also got one of the first personal stereos.