Low-Ball Offer

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Low-Ball Offer

An offer to buy something for an exceptionally low price. For example, if the asking price on a house is $200,000, a potential buyer may make a low-ball offer of $125,000.
References in periodicals archive ?
WASHINGTON, Shawwal 11, 1435, August 07, 2014, SPA -- After months of lowball offers and heels dug in, it took only 24 hours forBank of Americato suddenly cave in to the government, agreeing to the largest single federal settlement in the history of corporate America.
The source said that because people will steal try to sell scrap metal even if they are not licensed to do so, dealers have the power to make lowball offers.
Underperforming or weak companies are not viable deals and receive lowball offers and very little interest from financial buyers.
Brokers also noted that lowball offers gained little traction and bidding wars started anew at some properties.
Except when it comes to housing, which has become such a buyers' market in some locales that homeowners have taken their properties off the selling block because they have been so discouraged by lowball offers, Greiner said.
Compensation decisions will not be reviewed by the ECHR unless they are blatant lowball offers, Meleagrou said.
The scenario is now vexingly familiar to Tali Berzak, a vice president at NestSeekers International: Potential buyers at 99 John Street, a Downtown condo conversion where she is the project manager, come to the sales office believing the Financial District is depressed, and make lowball offers accordingly.
Under writing excellence, in its Trade/Technical category, the magazine won a Charlie Award for Best Feature, "The Upside of Lowball Offers," that appeared in the December 2007 issue; a Silver Award for Best Service Feature for "Successful Short Sale Seminars," April 2008; and a Bronze Award for Best Written Magazine.
Lowball offers or complicated proposals were death.
Fall house hunters are looking for bargains, so don't be surprised or offended if you receive lowball offers.
When the real estate market crashed, tales of lowball offers abounded in New York: Buyers were in many cases demanding discounts of 25, even 30 percent, off asking prices.
After the property had been on the market for two months, fully advertised, including with our international branch, Savills, we had only gotten really lowball offers, at 18 to 20 percent off the asking price.