Low-Ball Offer

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Low-Ball Offer

An offer to buy something for an exceptionally low price. For example, if the asking price on a house is $200,000, a potential buyer may make a low-ball offer of $125,000.
References in periodicals archive ?
WASHINGTON, Shawwal 11, 1435, August 07, 2014, SPA -- After months of lowball offers and heels dug in, it took only 24 hours forBank of Americato suddenly cave in to the government, agreeing to the largest single federal settlement in the history of corporate America.
The source said that because people will steal try to sell scrap metal even if they are not licensed to do so, dealers have the power to make lowball offers.
In one case victims of an accident caused by an Allstate insured claimed that the company had abused the legal process through its MIST practices, including making lowball offers of settlement despite clear liability and damages; according to its lawyer, Allstate had decided to "draw a line in the sand" and aggressively defend even justified MIST cases.
Brokers also noted that lowball offers gained little traction and bidding wars started anew at some properties.
Sutton's advice is not to make stupid, lowball offers, but to pay the right money for the right car, because next year you'll be glad you did.
Marvel is one of the few companies that can get away with such lowball offers.
Without piecing together any kind of rationale for pricing, Friedland said, brokers have few tools to convince tenants right now to do anything but cast out lowball offers in the hopes of bagging an office at bargain rates.
She's seen potential sellers get insulted at lowball offers and reject them, only to call back later asking if there's any hope to revive the deal.
We have found, in the past year, a lot of lowball offers from investors, people that know the market is in the tank.
Except when it comes to housing, which has become such a buyers' market in some locales that homeowners have taken their properties off the selling block because they have been so discouraged by lowball offers, Greiner said.
Compensation decisions will not be reviewed by the ECHR unless they are blatant lowball offers, Meleagrou said.
The scenario is now vexingly familiar to Tali Berzak, a vice president at NestSeekers International: Potential buyers at 99 John Street, a Downtown condo conversion where she is the project manager, come to the sales office believing the Financial District is depressed, and make lowball offers accordingly.