Low-Ball Offer

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Low-Ball Offer

An offer to buy something for an exceptionally low price. For example, if the asking price on a house is $200,000, a potential buyer may make a low-ball offer of $125,000.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jim Link, the association's executive vice president, said that buyers won't be successful pitching low-ball offers, but sellers have to set reasonable prices.
This makes the home vulnerable to low-ball offers and on a big, expensive home, this can mean the loss of hundreds of thousands of dollars in value," said Thomas Scott, Showhomes Vice-President of Operations.
Did a couple of low-ball offers for Ziggy really change your mind?
The report from Reuters news service said Apple was only getting low-ball offers from possible suitors.
The prior Special Committee failed to protect all stockholders' best interests by acceding to Sprint's two low-ball offers, locking the Company into coercive financing and corporate governance terms, and delegating all negotiating authority away from the Special Committee's members to Mr.
Unfortunately, to date Sun has only been willing to make low-ball offers and 'negotiate' through the press.
In many cases, they are holding onto underwater real estate loans not only because they don't want to accept low-ball offers, but also because they cannot afford the appearance of a large single-quarter loss, said real estate insiders.
Mini-tender hits Gannett: A Canadian investment firm that specializes in unsolicited mini-tenders -- low-ball offers that pray upon dim shareholders to buy less than five percent of a company's stock, thereby skirting Securities and Exchange Commission rules -- has come after Gannett Co.
And no one, according to La Conchita community leaders, has snapped up low-ball offers from real estate agents to buy their homes for between $200,000 and $400,000 - homes that were worth more than $500,000 before the slide.
RON SMOOKER Look there's been a long-standing concern about the misuse of personal information on company registers, not just restricted to the use for low-ball offers.
They don't stand out and they attract low-ball offers that lower property values.