Low-Ball Offer

Low-Ball Offer

An offer to buy something for an exceptionally low price. For example, if the asking price on a house is $200,000, a potential buyer may make a low-ball offer of $125,000.
References in periodicals archive ?
01 per share last week, although some consider the Brookfield's proposal a low-ball offer because it's well below independent value assessments.
And the canny Scot warned bargain hunters: "If you want to make a low-ball offer, please don't waste my time or yours.
For example, a defendant may make a low-ball offer of, say $1, that unexpectedly turns out to "satisfy the statutory requirements.
Spanish builder ACS is more likely to take legal action to defend its plan to take control of German peer Hochtief than improve its low-ball offer, analysts and press reports said on Tuesday.
Don't shoot yourself in the foot with a low-ball offer.
When I bought the 22-foot Glacier Bay, I knew darn well that both 90 hp outboards on the transom were hunks of junk, but the seller was willing to take a low-ball offer that left me with enough cash to buy a pair of new outboards.
Recently, Viacom-owned Paramount Pictures flipped Les the bird, refusing to take his low-ball offer for showing its movies on Showtime and announcing its own cable-TV channel.
Hays encouraged buyers by saying, "a low-ball offer certainly isn't as attractive as an offer at a premium, given our fiduciary obligations.
It wasn't a low-ball offer and we put forward a reasoned case as to why we felt it was fair.
At one point McGraw-Hill offered to buy it from me, which was flattering until they made what I thought was a ridiculous low-ball offer.
A buyer came to look at one of Falkenstein's listings and after seeing the house, made a low-ball offer.
We became aware they were going to make the low-ball offer weeks before it came down.