Lorenz curve

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Lorenz Curve

A graph showing what percentage of a population possesses a certain percentage of a thing. For example, a Lorenz curve may show that the top five percent of the people in a country control 40% of the wealth. While it may be used in ecology as well as some other fields, it is frequently used in economics to represent social inequality. It was developed in 1905.

Lorenz curve

see CONCENTRATION MEASURES.
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Lorenz curves for Pakistan, rural and urban sectors, as well as for the four provinces for 1979 and 1984-85 are presented in the next sub-section.
It advances upon Beach and Davidson (1983) by deriving the full (asymptotic) joint variance - covariance structure for marginal changes in the ordinates of Lorenz and generalized Lorenz curves.
Table 1 gives the estimated coefficients of the Lorenz curves for the 14 countries of this study.
v] be respectively the Lorenz curves corresponding to the set of shares [s.
Changes in income distribution can be ascertained either through drawing the Lorenz curves or through estimating different inequality indices, such as Gird Coefficient, coefficient of variation, standard deviation of logs of incomes, Theil's Index and Atkinson's Index.
Welfare economics uses Lorenz curves to display skewed income distributions and Gini indices to summarize the skewness.
Different approaches for refining the ranking of income distributions in cases where the Lorenz curves intersect are described in several papers.
Lorenz curves show the cumulative frequency of firms ranked according to their low-wage density.
Lorenz curves may be presumed to follow a particular parametric form and fit to the data.
Service-sector Lorenz curves are located in Panels A and C of Figure 7.
These results are illustrated by Lorenz curves and underpinned by developments in functional income distribution.