Longshoreman

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Longshoreman

A person who loads and unloads cargo from ships. Because these jobs are often both temporary and dangerous, longshoremen in the United States are entitled to coverage under the Longshore Act. A longshoreman is also called a docker or a stevedore.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such a strategy leaves readers wondering which factors were most important in limiting workers' political capacity and why other cases not considered here, such as the West Coast longshoremen, experienced greater success in expanding political capacity despite exposure to many of the same forces.
seaworthiness (7) to those longshoremen and harbor workers performing
CCTC longshoremen started to idle at work from midnight of Feb.
Due to a lack of records from World War II, no one will ever know if this really was the largest single-ship load out in FISC Pearl's history, but FISC's current longshoremen agree unanimously that it was the largest load out they have ever seen.
By striking repeatedly over the years, the longshoremen had brought their average pay up to over $77,000 a year in 1998.
The dispute between the shipping lines and longshoremen had been put on hold on 9 October, when President George W.
Philadelphia's longshoremen practiced "industrial syndicalism"; they relied on militant direct action tactics at the point of production and practiced an inclusive brand of unionism (all workers join the One Big Union, no matter what their craft, ethnicity, or race, to challenge managerial control).
The book documents the efforts of seamen and longshoremen, who were working throughout the last decades of the 19th century to gain control over their general working conditions, such as the means by which workers were hired, the size of the work crew, their hours of work, and their compensation.
But word of the protest preceded the ship: In Vancouver, as later in Kobe and Yokohama, Japan, longshoremen refused to touch the ship's disputed cargo.
Like the longshoremen immortalized in On the Waterfront, the former working class has been transmogrified into a quasi-lumpenproletariat pool of servants known as temp workers, a class without job security, benefits, or political influence.
Innkeepers at check-in desks, Judges in night court, Kitchen hands at truck stops, Longshoremen at the port.
In fact, longshoremen traditionally have been four times more susceptible to injury than the average manufacturing worker.