Long-Term Unemployment

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Long-Term Unemployment

The lack of work for an extended period of time, often defined as six months or longer. Long-term unemployment can be extremely harmful to the unemployed person because he/she may lose eligibility for certain government benefits if he/she has been out of work for too long. Likewise, significant long-term unemployment can create a vicious cycle for the economy at large: the skill set of the long-term unemployed workers may languish or even become obsolete in some industries, which makes it more difficult for them to find work when employers begin to hire again.
References in periodicals archive ?
The city also scores below average on pupils getting A-C grades at GCSE level, long-term unemployment rates, households living in fuel poverty and people using outdoor space for exercising.
Rather than including a variable for the long-term unemployment proportion as in our analysis, Kiley includes both short-term and long-term unemployment rates, which is functionally similar.
Both the short- and long-term unemployment rates rose considerably during the recession.
The report said long-term unemployment rates in CEB and SEE were on average three to four percentage points higher than before the crisis.
To the extent that the unemployment and long-term unemployment rates move together, the difference in coefficient estimates reflects the differences in mean levels.
In fact, long-term unemployment rates relative to total unemployment were above 40 percent in virtually every sector as of June 2012.
labor market is unlikely to suffer from the persistently high long-term unemployment rates that dogged Europe in the 1970s and 1980s.
Estonia has thus gone through a very high boom and very deep bust period in its economy, which is also reflected in long-term unemployment rates, making it an especially interesting case for studying regional and individual differences in long-term unemployment in the boom and bust periods.
By affecting these flow rates, labor-market institutions and policies influence both short - and long-term unemployment rates.
Long-term unemployment rates were lowest in Iceland, the United States and in Norway, with 0.
However, with respect to short-term and long-term unemployment rates things could be different.
A high long-term unemployment rate indicates that resources are insufficiently utilised and that there is a risk that people become permanently excluded from the active population.