Long-Term Trend

Long-Term Trend

Any price movement that occurs over a significant period of time, often over one year or several years. Long-term trends are difficult to predict and they are often interrupted by brief movements against the trend. For example, the dot-com bubble of the 1990s resulted in consistently high growth on the NASDAQ average, but this did not mean that NASDAQ rose every single day or even every week. See also: Secular market.
References in periodicals archive ?
Current weather conditions not-withstanding, the WMO's Clare Nullis says the temperature increase is part of a long-term trend.
4 in January, well above the 100 mark representing expansion above the long-term trend rate.
This report contains the following chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) Main NAEP and Long-Term Trend trends from 1990 to 2009; (3) Descriptions of the Main NAEP and Long-Term Trend surveys since 1990, with identification of similarities and differences; (4) Comparisons of trend measures limited to more nearly comparable populations based on modal age and modal grade; (5) An examination of population shifts and comparisons of subpopulation estimates from each of the NAEP surveys; (6) The effects of population shifts; (7) Conclusions.
A comparison of the ratio of prices to incomes with the long-term trend suggests Canadian house prices were overvalued by as much as 18 per cent in late 2009.
another factor is the long-term trend for plastics machinery productivity to outstrip growth in plastics markets.
Long-term trend following is the heart and soul of managed futures, started by such pioneers as John W.
If the long-term trend continues, all fish species are projected to collapse within my lifetime--by 2048.
Even simple long-term trend analyses suggest an upward trend for all recovered fiber prices, except perhaps sorted office paper (SOP).
A long-term trend toward boards with fewer directors continued during the past year.
However, despite the moderate gain in the 1990s, the long-term trend has been a decrease in steel use per vehicle by 16%.
Resulting long-term trend lines can be brought into close concordance.
Need-based Pell Grants grew by 23 percent in 2001, but this increase is much higher than the long-term trend.