Lock-up period


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Lockup Period

A time during which a publicly-traded company forbids management and large stockholders to sell their shares, usually following an initial public offering. Depending on the company, the lockup period may be 90 to 180 days. It exists to ensure that the market is not flooded with shares in the company at any given time, which would increase supply and cause a drop in price. Large shareholders selling their shares may also be seen as an indication of a lack of confidence in the company, triggering a panic sell. After the lockup period ends, however, shareholders may sell without restriction.

Lock-up period.

A lock-up period is the time during which you cannot sell an investment that you own.

You are most likely to encounter a lock-up period if you acquire shares in an initial public offering (IPO) because you had a private equity investment in the company before it went public and receive shares in the IPO proportionate to your private equity ownership interest.

You may also have a lock-up period if you are an owner or an employee of the company and are granted shares.

The lock-up period may last as long as 180 days. In some cases, though, the lock-up period is graduated, meaning that after the initial 180 days you can sell an increasingly larger portion of your shares over the next two years.

After the lock-up period ends, you are free to sell all your shares if you wish.

References in periodicals archive ?
As part of the changes, which are yet to be officially announced, the lock-up period for funds under China's Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor (QFII) program will be removed, allowing international investors to withdraw their money on a daily basis.
The specific provision in the IPO lock-up agreements being waived is the lock-up extension provision that may extend, upon the occurrence of certain events, the 180-day IPO lock-up period for an additional period of up to 34 days.
Starting in just a few months, they will be free to sell their shares as the so-called lock-up period expires.
When an IPO lock-up period expires, more shares are available for trading, placing a greater supply of stock in the stock market.
Technology companies showed greater volatility around the expiration of their lock-up periods than did life sciences companies.