Donor

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Related to Living Donor: Kidney donation

Donor

One who gives property or assets to someone else through the vehicle of a trust.

Donor

A person or institution who gives assets to another person or institution, either directly or through a trust. Under most circumstances, donors can deduct the value (or depreciated value) of the assets given from their taxable income. While many donors give out of the goodness of their hearts, many do so in order to avoid taxes, especially when donating through a trust.

donor

One who gives a gift.

References in periodicals archive ?
Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy: a look at current trends and practice patterns at major transplant centers across the United States.
Delayed graft function and the risk of death with graft function in living donor kidney transplant recipients.
The discussion that began in 2000 at the Live Organ Donor Consensus Group arrived at the following conclusion about the role of the independent living donor advocate.
He congratulated the entire team on this success and emphasized upon the team to cherish this historic movement with full enthusiasm as history has been made to do the first paediatric living donor liver transplant in Pakistan.
Living donor transplantation offers a number of advantages.
This report describes the first confirmed case of HIV transmission through organ transplantation from a living donor reported since 1989 (1) and the first such transmission documented in the United States since laboratory screening for HIV infection became available in 1985.
Living donor kidneys in most cases are superior to a deceased donor kidney.
Does this mean that African Americans should be excluded as living donors on grounds that we do not know how to identify those at increased risk of developing kidney disease themselves?
Kidney swapping--or paired donation--is one option that is helping more patients get transplants from living donors.
During the first six months of 1999, there were 109 living donor renal transplants performed in Britain.
Transplants between spouses are more common than people might think -accounting for almost half of all living donor operations at Walsgrave.
When I told them I had a living donor and I never had to go on dialysis, they would ask who the donor was.