zombie

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Zombie

A publicly-traded company that continues operations despite a merger or bankruptcy. Stocks in zombies are usually low in price because the companies are likely to cease operations (and the stocks will consequently become worthless). However, a few bottom feeders may be interested in a zombie if they believe that it can restructure and become profitable.

zombie

A company that remains in business even though it is technically bankrupt and almost surely headed for the graveyard.
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RETURN NICHOLAS HOULT plays R, one of the living dead
Section 1, "Night" (the lengthiest section of the book), consists of five chapters and an "interlude" that discuss Romero's 1968 Night of the Living Dead and various re-issues and remakes, including stage-based productions.
An experienced team of set designers and scenic artists are working around the clock to create a real-life version of the zombie apocalypse that has been so memorably and frighteningly portrayed by the series of Living Dead films shot in and around the Pittsburgh area over the last 40 years.
Whether lapping up Living Dead Girl or dancing to Dragula, the Zombie army was in raptures.
The Living Dead is surreal comedy played with a poker-face," added the father-of-two.
Zombie king GeorgeRomero is back for the billionth time since 1968's Night Of The Living Dead.
As subsequent genre pictures, trailing titles like Zombi 2 and Zombie Flesh Eaters 3, ate their way through America's VCRs, Wood elaborated his original claims, averring in his 1986 book Hollywood From Vietnam to Reagan that the living dead "represent, on a metaphorical level, the whole dead weight of patriarchal consumer capitalism, from whose habits of behavior and desire not even Hare Krishnas and nuns .
Charlaine Harris is the author of four previous Sookie Stackhouse novels; Dead Until Dark, Living Dead in Dallas, Club Dead, and Dead to the World.
Say what you will about the '80s--these films got us away from the image of the living dead as a craggy Middle European in a rented tuxedo.
At the same time, the fortresslike embankment, encrusted with a repeated skull motif, renders the gallery as crypt; it is the viewers (we quickly realize) who are the living dead.
If the modern horror film was born in 1968 with Night Of The Living Dead, it came of age 23 years later with Sam Raimi's zombie shocker, The Evil Dead.
A ban on these would surely improve things when the living dead pour on to our streets at closing, and would show that we mean business.