Competence

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Related to Linguistic competence: Linguistic performance, Communicative competence

Competence

Sufficient ability or fitness for one's needs. The necessary abilities to be qualified to achieve a certain goal or complete a project.

Competence

The ability to complete a project, make a product, or otherwise do what is required. Both individuals and companies have competence. For example, an engineer would not likely find a job as a nurse because it is outside his competence, that is, his ability to do the required work. Likewise, a dental office is unlikely to be hired to design a skyscraper.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further research is necessary to examine the influence of time-post onset on linguistic competence, pragmatic performance, and functional communication.
Communicative Linguistic Competence was evidenced by comparable memory for events (B&P) heard in English (E) versus Greek (G) among first (3.
Recognition is symptomatic of linguistic competence, whilst production is indicative of performance.
at 16-17; (4) because--as a minimal claim bearing on the "psychological reality of language" beyond which we should remain neutral--the speaker's competence and its processing-rules must respect the governing structure-rules; "a theory of a person's linguistic competence, of her knowledge of her language, must constrain a theory of her linguistic output; and vice versa," id.
Writing them down, on the other hand, requires linguistic competence and skills that might allow secondary processes to take over.
Lacking such linguistic competence, I will have to confine myself to the impression which the English version makes.
The chapter includes a discussion of Bruner's contributions in which narrative competence is taken to be prior to linguistic competence.
Perhaps it may have been easier for them to do this because as children suddenly called upon - by the inexorable pressure of their peer groups first of all - to possess a completely new linguistic competence, their primary associations were with the spoken language.
correspondence between unmutated and mutated sounds), thus a nonaudible equivalence, existing only on the level of linguistic competence.
But there is a way to give such a meaning theory--a meaning theory proper which, using classical logic only, meets a meaning-theoretic analogue of Convention T, satisfies Davidson's three key desiderata for a theory of meaning, reflects linguistic competence, and avoids quantifying over meanings.
It is based on the linguistic competence of speech act participants, their common thesaurus and social experience, making up a considerable part of scientific communication background knowledge.

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